.NET CLR monitor installation

.NET CLR monitor installation

Requirements

1. LoadRunner 7.8 Feature Pack 1 or above.

2. Controller machine must have a full installation of LoadRunner.

3. To use the monitor, you need the license for the Microsoft .NET CLR.

4. The server machine must have the Microsoft .NET Framework version 1.1 installed.

5. Supported on all Windows OS including Windows 2003.

Installation

1. For LoadRunner8.0

For LoadRunner8, you do not need to install any additional component on the controller machine. However, on the .Net Server machine, you need to run Mercury’s ‘Microsoft .Net Server Monitor Probe’ to configure the .Net Server machine for .NET monitoring. To install the .Net Probe component,

a. Locate the LoadRunner Addin installation CD

b. Navigate to Additional ComponentsDot_NetProbe directory

c. Run Dot_Net_Probe.exe file.

Note: If you want to monitor a service on the Microsoft .Net Server machine, you should install LoadRunner’s Net Server Monitor Probe as a service. This is the case when you want to monitor the .Net components running under the IIS Web server. To install the probe as a service, you just enter the domain, user name, and password at the install.

2. For LoadRunner 7.8

  1. Apply LoadRunner Feature Pack 1 on all the LoadRunner machines.
  2. On the Microsoft .Net Server machine, run <Dot_Net_Server_Add-in.exe>. To obtain this file, run the UpdateService (Start à Programs à LR à UpdateService) and select ". Net monitor – server side installation." from a machine with LoadRunner7.8 or 7.8 FP1 install

Note: If you want to monitor a service on the Microsoft .Net Server machine, you should install LoadRunner’s .Net agent as a service. This is the case when you want to monitor the .Net components running under the IIS Web server. To install the .Net agent as a service, you just enter the domain, user name, and password at the end of the server side installation.

Configuring the Microsoft .NET CRL monitor

Microsoft .NET Server Setup

To monitor Microsoft .NET server performance, you must first install the Microsoft .NET Server Monitor Probe on the server machine, and select the components (applications and assemblies) for .NET profiling:

1. On the .NET server machine, select the .NET Monitor Configure program from the Windows Start menu. The .NET Monitor Configure window opens.

2. Click <Add>, select a .NET executable or assembly file to profile, and click <Open>. The selection is displayed in the .NET Monitor Configure window.

Field Description
Applications and assemblies enabled for profiling: Displays the applications and assemblies that are selected for .NET profiling.
Add Click this button to select an application for profiling.
Remove Click this button to remove the selected application.
Save Click this button to save the displayed applications and profiling.
Enable/Disable Profiling:

Profiling enabled

Select this option to enable profiling. Profiling may slow down system performance. Use this option to enable or disable .NET profiling.

To ensure that changes to this option take effect immediately, reboot the computer, or log out and log back in.

3. Click <Add>, select a .NET executable or assembly file to profile, and click <Open>. The selection is displayed in the .NET Monitor Configure window

4. Click <Save>.

5. Enable or disable profiling, and click <Close>.

LoadRunner Controller Setup

1. Click on the Microsoft .NET CLR graph in the graph tree, and drag it into the right pane of the Run view.

2. Right-click the graph and choose "Add Measurements."

3. In the Monitored Server Machines section of the Microsoft .NET CLR dialog box, click <Add> to enter the server name or IP address of the machine you want to monitor. Select the platform on which the machine runs, and click <OK>.

Note: To connect to the monitor over a firewall, enter the server name or IP address of the machine you want to monitor, according to the following format:

<MI Listener machine>:<server machine key>

Example: 111.111.111.111.ServerLocalMachineKey

4. In the Resource Measurements section of the Microsoft .NET CLR dialog box, select the server running .NET and click <Add>. The .NET Performance Monitors dialog box opens displaying the available measurements

5. Browse the Measured Components tree, and check the required performance counters in the .NET Performance Monitors window’s right pane.

6. To activate the Microsoft .NET CLR monitor, click <OK> in the .NET Performance Monitors dialog box and in the Microsoft .NET CLR dialog box.

Note: The data sampling rate for the .NET monitor is fixed (five seconds) and cannot be modified using the Controller Tools à Options à Monitors dialog.

Performance Counter

Application Level

Measurement Description
Application Lifetime Monitors the duration of the application in seconds.
Exception Frequency Monitors the number of exceptions per second, in the five second polling period.
JIT (Just In Time) Duration Monitors the time, in seconds, it takes for the JIT to compile code.
Thread Creation Frequency Monitors the number of threads that are created in a polling period.
Thread Lifetime Monitors the duration of threads.
Domain Creation Frequency Monitors the number of domain creations in a polling period. (Domains protect areas of code. All applications run in a domain which keeps them encapsulated, so that they cannot interfere with other applications outside the domain).
Domain Load Time Monitors the time it takes to load a domain. (Domains protect areas of code. All applications run in a domain which keeps them encapsulated, so that they cannot interfere with other applications outside the domain).
Domain Unload Time Monitors the time it takes to unload a domain. (Domains protect areas of code. All applications run in a domain which keeps them encapsulated, so that they cannot interfere with other applications outside the domain).
Domain Lifetime Monitors the duration of a domain. (Domains protect areas of code. All applications run in a domain which keeps them encapsulated, so that they cannot interfere with other applications outside the domain).
Module Creation Frequency Monitors the number of modules that get created in a polling period. (Modules are groups of assemblies that make up a DLL or EXE.)
Module Load Time Monitors the time it takes to load a module. (Modules are groups of assemblies that make up a dll or exe.)
Module Unload Time Monitors the time it takes to unload a module. (Modules are groups of assemblies that make up a dll or exe.)
Module Lifetime Monitors the duration of a module. (Modules are groups of assemblies that make up a dll or exe.)
Garbage Collection Duration Monitors the duration between the start and stop of Garbage Collection.
Garbage Collection Frequency Monitors the number of breaks for Garbage Collections in a polling period.
Unmanaged Code Duration Monitors the duration of the calls to unmanaged code.
Unmanaged Code Frequency Monitors the number of calls to unmanaged code.

Assembly Level

Measurement Description
Assembly Creation Frequency Monitors the number of assembly creations in a polling period. (Assemblies hold the .NET byte code and metadata).
Assembly Load Time Monitors the time it takes to load an assembly. (Assemblies hold the .NET byte code and metadata).
Assembly Unload Time Monitors the time it takes to unload an assembly. (Assemblies hold the .NET byte code and metadata).
Assembly Lifetime Monitors the duration of an assembly. (Assemblies hold the .NET byte code and metadata).

Class Level

Measurement Description
Class Lifetime Monitors the duration of a class.
Class Load Time Monitors the time it takes to load a class.
Class Unload Time Monitors the time it takes to unload a class.

Method Level

At the method level, the measured time is per method, exclusive of other methods, calls to unmanaged code, and garbage collection time.

Measurement Description
Method Duration Monitors the duration of a method.
Method Frequency Monitors the number of methods called in a polling period.
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s